R. Benedito Ferrão will present “Twenty-Five Years after Dominic D’souza: Of (De)Coloniality and (Un)Queer Reclamations”

Posted Leave a commentPosted in News
R. Benedito Ferrão will present “Twenty-Five Years after Dominic D’souza: Of (De)Coloniality and (Un)Queer Reclamations” at the UW-Madison Annual Conference on South Asia’s Feminist Pre-Conference: Gender, Sexuality, and Occupation, on 26 October, 2017.

Abstract:
On this, the twenty-fifth anniversary of Dominic D’souza’s death, and in light of the global shift away from AIDS-activism and towards marriage equality as the defining factor of current gay identity, this presentation will consider how the reclamation of D’souza as a Goan figure may renew the possibility of decolonial queer activism in South Asia.

More information here: http://southasiaconference.wisc.edu/559.htm

Dale Luis Menezes will present a paper titled, “Reginald Fernandes and Concanim ‘Romans’ in the Literary History of Goa”

Posted Leave a commentPosted in News

Dale Luis Menezes will present a paper titled, “Reginald Fernandes and Concanim ‘Romans’ in the Literary History of Goa” at the III Congresso Internacional do LIA – Laboratório de Interlocuções com a Ásia, on 19 October, 2017 at Casa de Portugal, São Paulo, Brazil. This presentation will be part of the Pensando Goa project, which aims to produce a literary history of Goa.

 

Reginald Fernandes’ writing career spans almost 40 years. This period that stretched around c 1955-1992, Fernandes wrote more than 120 novels or what in Concanim came to be known as ‘romans’ or ‘romaxeo’ (pl.). The Concanim ‘romans’ is not adequately studied, neither in the history of Konknni literature nor in the history of Goan literature. Fernandes’ writings give the impression of pulp on first glance: they were printed on cheap paper, the books were pocket-sized, the plots were formulaic and revolved around love stories, crimes, and magic realism, and the language used had a touch of the dramatic in it. Perhaps this is the reason why dominant canons of Konkani and Goan literature never seriously considered the writings of Fernandes – or indeed other writers in the genre of ‘romans’ – as legitimately constituting literature.

 

Fernandes’ writings not only talk about Goa, but also other places like Africa – often set in a magic realism-esque manner. The language used in Fernandes’ novels is infused with Portuguese or Portuguese-inflected words, and as such it points to larger connections across linguistic and geographical boundaries. Fernandes was inspired by pulp fiction in English – both in English pulp writings and films—which also suggests that Goan literature through the Concanim ‘romans’ had wider connections with other literary cultures. This study proposes to discuss the life and career of Fernandes and locate him in the historical context in which he produced his oeuvre.

Book Launch: Renver Borovp: Nibond & Niyall

Posted Leave a commentPosted in News

Renver Borovp: Nibond & Niyall (Writings on Sand: Essays & Reflections), writings by the late Fr. Martinho Noronha, edited by Dale Luis Menezes, will be released on Friday, 6 October, 2017 by the Archbishop of Goa and Daman, Rev. Filipe Neri Ferrão at the Multipurpose Hall, Krishnadas Shama Library or the Central Library, Patto, Panjim, Goa at 4 pm. The book is published by the Dalgado Konknni Akademi.

 

The title of the book draws from Fr. Noronha’s weekly column, written in the Konkani weekly Vauraddeancho Ixtt from 1978-1982. The inspiration for this title came from the biblical story of the woman taken in adultery where Christ writes in the sand. Fr. Noronha explained that the incident had a deep significance for him, as he believed that what is written on sand has the potential to touch our hearts. Fr. Noronha served as the editor of Renovação, the bulletin of the Archdiocese of Goa, after he finished his stint as a columnist for Vauraddeancho Ixtt.

 

This compilation contains all the articles that appeared in Vauraddeancho Ixtt. Fr. Noronha’s column dealt with issues of everyday life. For instance, the ever-rising price of sugar in the 1970s and 1980s was a recurrent topic in his columns. Additionally, Fr. Noronha reflected on Goan and national politics, Goan identity, the Konkani language and the controversy over the failure of the Roman script in Konkani, as well as issues pertaining to the Church and Christians in Goa. These writings allow us a critical insight into the recent past and bear witness to the fact that despite the passage of decades the many issues that Goans face remain constant.

Sorgest Pri. Martinho Noronha-n boroilolea Renver Borovp: Nibond & Niyall hea pustokachi uzvaddaunni Gõy ani Damanvche Arsebisp, Manadik Filipe Neri Ferrão hanchea hatantlean Sukrar, 6 Otubr 2017 disa sanjechea 4 vorancher Multipurpose Hall, Krishnadas Shama Library vo Central Library, Patto, Ponnje, Gõy hanga zatoli. Hea pustokachem sonkolon ani sompadon Dale Luis Menezes-an kelam ani Dalgado Konknni Akademi-n pustok chhaplam.

 

1978-1982 hea kallant Pri. Martinho Noronha Vauraddeancho Ixtt satalleacher Renver Borovp hea nanva khala aplo vibhag-lekh (column) boroitalo. Tea nanvacho adhar gheun hea pustokak mathallo dilolo asa. Borovpi hea mathalleachem xrey Povitr Pustokant aslolie eke ghoddniek dita. Niti khatir jednam Jezu mukhar ekie pordvar ostoriek haddli tednam Tannem renver kitem tori boroilem. Pri. Martinho amkam sangta ki khub pautti ami kagdacher boroilolem visortanv punn renver boroilolem-i amchea kallzant rigonk xokta. Renovação hea Gõy Arkdiosezichea niyall-potracho (bulletin) Pri. Noronha sompadok aslo. Vauraddeancho Ixtt satalleacher vibhag-lekh borovpachem bond korun tannem Renovação-chim sutram hatant ghetlim.

 

Hea pustokant Vauraddeancho Ixtt-acher chhapun yeilole sogle lekhancho aspav asa. Jinnechea chaltea ghoddam-moddincher dor sumanak Pri. Noronha aple lekh boroitalo. Tea khatir 1970 ani 1980-chea kallant jednam sakrechem mol choddot aslem, tednam hie vixim portun-portun ul’lekh zalolo amkam tachea lekhamni vachunk melltta. Tea bhair, Gõychea ani raxttriy rajkaronnacher, Konknni bhas ani lipi vad, ani Igorz ani Kristanvam mukhar aslolea mud’deancher Pri. Noronha-n aplem borovp kelem. Hi borpam sorun gelolea eka kallachem dorxon ghoddoitat ani zaiteach doskam uprantui je prosn tea kallar amkam sotaitale tech prosn atam-i apli tokli voir kaddttat hem Pri. Noronha-chim borpam amkam govai ditat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remembering Thälmann

Posted Leave a commentPosted in News

By ALBERTINA ALMEIDA

 

Goa has lost a leading light in the death of Thälmann Pereira, advocate and trade unionist, and State Secretary of the Goa Unit of the Communist Party of India (Marxist). Thälmann was born in 1962 into a communist household. His parents led the party in Goa and were intimately involved with it. This probably is why he was named after the founder of the Communist Party in Germany, Ernst Thälmann. Yet despite this proximate connection, he did not, unlike many Communist leaders, wear this legacy on his sleeve. So much so that even his wife, Rita Dey Pereira, said that she did not, during their courtship, have an idea of the amount of space the red (meaning Communist) flag occupied in his life. It began unfurling during the course of their married life, to use her own words.

 

(more…)

Dale Luis Menezes will make a presentation on “‘Azulejo’ tiles and the Islamicate in Goa”

Posted Leave a commentPosted in News

Exploring the Islamicate in Goa, Dale Luis Menezes will make a short presentation titled, “Azulejo tiles and the Islamicate in Goa” on September 4, 2017, at 7 pm, at 6 Assagao.

 

The presentation will focus on the azulejo tiles used in 17th century monuments in Goa. These tiles which were originally produced by the Persians, found their way to Western Europe through the Arabs. Initially Spain and later Portugal, adopted the art of making azulejo to so great an extent that it became indigenous to these two countries. The Augustinian buildings in Goa (Nossa Senhora de Graça [Our Lady of Grace] church, along with the convent of Santa Monica) located in Old Goa are the only religious buildings known to have used such tiles for ornamentation (c. 17th century and later). The complex political geographies in which the Portuguese Estado da Índia was located consisted of many forts, ports, as well as imperial formations such as those of the Mughals, Ottomans, Safavids and so on. Officials, missionaries, and traders from Goa would often travel within these realms. Hence, one can imagine a space that was connected with each other in dynamic ways, exchanging not just goods, but also cultural artifacts. The fact that such dynamics exchanges were taking place regularly should essentially make us seek the many ways in which cultural artifacts were exchanged. One such way of doing this is to deeply explore the ‘Islamicate’, which, as Marshall G. S. Hodgson and other historians subsequently have argued, is cultural and artistic practices inspired and related to Islam, but which is not necessarily religious in nature. Thus, one can easily expect to find Islamicate art right in the middle of a Catholic church or a Hindu temple. By formulating questions and theories about the origins of the azulejo tiles used in the Augustinian buildings, and the political conditions that may have led to their transport in Goa, this presentation seeks to open up Goan history to the Islamicate.

 

Albertina Almeida’s statement to the negotiators of the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership, at the 19th Round of Negotiations at Hyderabad

Posted Leave a commentPosted in News

At the outset, I would like to remind you, that we cannot talk of a Comprehensive Economic Partnership without it being inclusive. In the spirit of substantive equality which India’s Constitution makers have envisioned with such foresight, and which the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) also emphasises, to be inclusive, both the process and the result must promote equality, promote equal democratic rights, must result in more equitable access to resources, more sustainable income generating opportunities and advance Development Justice for those who are most marginalised in each of these participating countries, and this includes women with their intersecting identities of caste, class, minority, and other axis of marginalisation. India is currently the second most unequal country in the world in terms of the distribution of wealth and gender inequality has been deepening in our country being one of the only countries where the division of labour and income gap is widening. This Agreement will accelerate further these inequalities.

We want to work in solidarity with our neighbours but any agreement with them must have objectives that ensure basic human rights to food, clothing, shelter, public universal access to basic amenities of water, electricity, and clean air, health facilities, education, sustainable and decent work and income earning opportunities to the peoples in each of these participating countries, and systems of accountability that mean existing human rights and environmental obligations will always have primacy over foreign investor interests.

 

(more…)

R. Benedito Ferrão to present a paper entitled ‘With this Sea-Port I thee Wed: Of Royal Dowries and Self-Makingin Salman Rushdie’s “Midnight’s Children”‘

Posted Leave a commentPosted in News

R. Benedito Ferrão will present a paper titled ‘With this Sea-Port I thee Wed: Of Royal Dowries and Self-Makingin Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children‘ at the Oceans and Shores: Heritage, People, and Environments conference – III CHAM International conference, FCSH/Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 12-15 July, 2017.

 

Ferrão’s paper will examine how Rushdie’s novel, Midnight’s Children, uses the early modern history of sea-ports and maritime trade to underscore the postcolonial location of characters and their Lusophonic connections as subaltern legacies subsumed in post-British India.

 

In having Mary Pereira/Braganza be Goan, Midnight’s Children brings into focus the significant utility of his character’s native land in the European imperial history of South Asia. Mary Pereira evokes the figure of Goa as one of the earliest colonies and then the last foreign dominion (1510-1961) in what was to become modern day India. In adopting the Braganza moniker, the character recalls an important historical moment in the making of coloniality. The 1662 marriage of Catherine of Braganza to Charles II was orchestrated to secure the relationship between two colonial powers. Through the alliance, England received the port city of Bombay as dowry.

 

Further, in renaming herself after the Portuguese infanta, Mary Pereira also evokes that other Catherine. On 25 November, 1510, Afonso de Albuquerque took the port of Goa. It was the feast day of Saint Catherine of Alexandria, and the Portuguese conqueror believed she had overseen his defeat of the Muslim ruler of the enclave. This conquestchanged the course of commercial relations between Europe and Asia, displacing Middle Eastern trade hegemonies. Simultaneously, the site where Saint Catherine discovered her faith – North Africa – doubly pagan and quintessentially “other” in the later Occidental imagination is also the continental location from which sprung the Moors: Muslims who once ruled over Iberia.

 

By centring on the iconic naming and renaming of Mary Pereira in Midnight’s Children, the paper argues that the novel uses the history of the ports of Goa and Bombay to challenge the Anglo-centrism of postcolonial thought in relation to India, especially by highlighting maritime commerce.

 

More information about the conference here.

Vishvesh Kandolkar and Pithamber Polsani to present a paper entitled ‘The Ruination of the Inconvenient: Eroding Goa’s Intangible Heritage’

Posted Leave a commentPosted in News

Vishvesh Kandolkar and Pithamber Polsani will present a paper titled ‘The Ruination of the Inconvenient: Eroding Goa’s Intangible Heritage’ at the conference on Preserving Transcultural Heritage: Your Way or My Way, to be held at the School of Arts and Humanities, University of Lisbon, from 5-8 July, 2017.

 

In this paper, the authors argue that the architecture of monuments is not only emblematic of the history of a place, but also the lived experience of its people. Subsequent to Goa’s annexation by India, the State’s political dispensation has continued to obscure the history of the Portuguese empire in Goa while conveniently using the heritage of the Estado period in promotion of its tourism industry. The State’s attitude to heritage conservation has been biased towards addressing only the tangible components of heritage, such as architecture, while sidelining such intangible heritage as minoritised people who also require protection.

 

Amita Kanekar to present a paper entitled ‘The Politics of Renovation: The Disappearing Architecture of Goa’s Old Brahmanical Temples’

Posted Leave a commentPosted in News

Amita Kanekar will present a paper titled ‘The Politics of Renovation: The Disappearing Architecture of Goa’s Old Brahmanical Temples’ at the conference on Preserving Transcultural Heritage: Your Way or My Way, to be held at the School of Arts and Humanities, University of Lisbon, from 5-8 July, 2017.

 

Kanekar’s paper will look at the unique architecture of Goa’s old Brahmanical shrines that is under threat today, and one of the reasons seems to be a perception that it is not Hindu enough. Goa’s centuries-long Islamicate and Iberian connections have left behind a heterogeneous culture in many aspects, including architecture. The many Brahmanical temples built from the seventeenth century onwards are examples of this, their hybrid forms belonging as much to the Islamicate world and the European Renaissance as to local building traditions. But, while these temples still stand today and attract increasing numbers of worshippers, their original architecture is disappearing, to be replaced by forms and elements from outside Goa. This paper examines the attempts to erase these unique forms, and the relation of this to the social, political, and legal context.

R. Benedito Ferrão to present a paper entitled ‘A Garden Overgrown: Panjim’s Garcia da Orta Park and the Remaking of Eco-Cultural Legacies’

Posted Leave a commentPosted in News

R. Benedito Ferrão will present a paper titled ‘A Garden Overgrown: Panjim’s Garcia da Orta Park and the Remaking of Eco-Cultural Legacies’ at the conference on Preserving Transcultural Heritage: Your Way or My Way, to be held at the School of Arts and Humanities, University of Lisbon, from 5-8 July, 2017.

 

Ferrão’s paper will dwell on Garcia da Orta’s text Colóquios dos Simples e Drogas e Cousas Medicinias da Índia (1563) which catalogues regional plant-life and da Orta’s legacy in contemporary Goa. Despite da Orta’s life’s work, his Catholicism appears to be an issue for the State. In seeking to orchestrate other legacies for Goa, local governmental machinations have been imbued with India’s right-wing politics in the quest for a Hindu historical consciousness for the once Portuguese region. For example, in 2012 the State sought to situate an architectural monument at this park to commemorate the service of seventeenth century Saraswat Brahmin physicians who had been involved in compiling another botanical text – the Hortus Malabaricus (1678-1693). Whether these botanists may have actually been Goan seems irrelevant, for their caste lineages evoke those of Goa’s contemporary political elite, signaling the Brahmanical Hindu hegemony of the Indian nation-state.